Facebook has come a long way; from the college-only network to the largest social-networking site on the web. Constantly making adjustments  and changes to better fit the status quo, Facebook does all necessary to make sure the moves they make are fair and just. Faced with challenges ranging from inappropriate images to job threatening posts, even information availability; Facebook tries to cover all angles. They could easily do nothing about it, rather they ask for comments and opinions  from the end-users themselves. For those that say Facebook only cares about themselves, the ball is in your court now. Speak Up, Be Heard!

Tat Wza

Today we are proposing some updates to two documents which govern our site: our Data Use Policy, which explains how we collect and use data when people use Facebook, and our Statement of Rights and Responsibilities (SRR), which explains the terms governing the use of our services. These updates provide more detailed information about our practices, reflect changes to our products, and improve how we conduct our site governance process.

Improving the Site Governance Process: Our goal has always been to find ways to effectively engage your views when we propose changes to our governing policies. That commitment guided our decision in 2009 to launch an unprecedented process for user feedback. When we held our second global site governance vote in June, we indicated that we would review our site governance process in light of the growth of both our community – to over one billion users – and our company – which is now publicly traded and accountable to regulators around the world. Our intention was to make sure the process still served its original purpose.

As a result of this review, we are proposing to restructure our site governance process. We deeply value the feedback we receive from you during our comment period. In the past, your substantive feedback has led to changes to the proposals we made. However, we found that the voting mechanism, which is triggered by a specific number of comments, actually resulted in a system that incentivized the quantity of comments over their quality. Therefore, we’re proposing to end the voting component of the process in favor of a system that leads to more meaningful feedback and engagement.